Acoustic Guitar MIDI Mod

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Check this out!

ACPAD – World’s First Wireless MIDI Controller for Acoustic Guitar. The perfect bridge between electronic and acoustic music!

The ACPAD allows players to blend both acoustic and electronic sounds with FX and assignable tap pads. Create whatever sound you want with ACPAD. It is strong, flexible and offers a new world of creativity you have been looking for. ACPAD is an electronic orchestra in your hands!

Look for this project on KickStarter.

via my mate @chuparkoff


Kaossilator 2 Jam on Plastic Table Cloth

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Here’s a jam I recorded on my new Korg Kaossilator 2. I restricted myself to a short, unedited session with no post processing or other mistake-fixing. What you’re hearing is just the sound recorded directly in the device while I improvise on it.

The Kaossilator 2 is so much fun I am starting to drool over the Kaossilator Pro which is bigger and more powerful. Honestly though, the fact that I can keep this little thing in my pocket makes it much more usable.

If you are not familiar with Kaossilators, the sound is super fat. The Kaossilator 2 has a full hardware PCM engine with 150 different sound programs. It has drum patterns, kits, chords, bass, acoustic, lead and sound effect banks, each of which can be played in any key on the touch pad which can be switched to dozens of different scales. One of the coolest features is a gate arpegiator with 30 different rhythmic patterns so if you put the scales and arpeggiator together you can get pretty precise good control of notes and timing. It even has variable swing.

Oh, there’s also an iPhone/iPad app called iKaossilator (see what they did there?) which really is a different beast. It’s good for the same kind of stuff but it has very different abilities. It’s more like a five track looping sequencer. You can edit your five tracks in only a limited way but they remain independent. This limits additive layering but enables more precise mixing because you can solo and mute five parts. The 16 beat loop length also really expands the options. No gate arpeggiator though.

Overdubbing into two independent beat-matched loopers allows you to build up and break down tracks. You can also cross fade them. It has some serious limitations which may annoy some (no undo, no ping ponging) and it only does up to 8 beat loops which is a real killer if you want to do anything like a pop tune or most things with chord progressions. Nevertheless, for electronic dance music, various bass music styles, jazz genres like afrobeat and anything else with layers and loops, it’s an excellent sketch pad for making beats.


Tenori-On Synthesiser Test

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Yamaha produced a kind of experimental control surface for electronic musicians called the Tenori-On. The interface is a little too experimental for my taste, but it does show how you can control almost every aspect of a multi-track composition with a simple matrix of lights – track volume, modulation, instrument selection, melodic sequencing and pattern composition to name a few. I had a chance to play with a software reproduction of this device for the iPhone. The result is a very rough sketch of a melodic electronica vibe:


Hot Hand Bass Guitar Dubstep Wobbles Update

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A while ago we blogged about masterful bassist Nathan Navarro producing some pretty dope dubstep wobbles live on a bass guitar. At the time, Nathan was using the Source Audio Hot Hand which a lot of our visitors have been particularly interested in.

In case you don’t know, the Hot Hand is just like a guitar pedal, except that you can activate it by moving your hand. But it’s better than that. If you want to continuously change an effect, like a Wah Pedal, you can use it to modulate the sound. Of course the sound doesn’t just have to be a Wah Wah, and it works great for a lead guitar as well.

Better than that, you can actually control two parameters at once, so, really it’s more like a 2D control surface like a laptop trackpad. Being a modern control, you can choose what parameters you control, so it’s no surprise that Nathan manages to pump out some serious wub wubs and wow wows.

Great news for anyone who has been holding out before getting one of these babies, since our previous post there is a new version, the Hot Hand 3. It’s compatible with everything, has a huge wireless range and gives more options and more control than the earlier versions.

Check it now:

As Nathan demonstrates, you can have the Hot Hand on the headstock of the guitar or bass and move the whole guitar to generate an effect, or you can have the Hot Hand ring on which allows hand movements to do the same… or, if you’re Nathan Navarro, both at once!